Traditional Japanese musical instruments are musical instruments used in the traditional and folk music of Japan. They comprise a range of string, wind, and percussion instruments. (source: Wiki)
The koto (Japanese: 箏) is a traditional Japanese stringed musical instrument. The koto is the national instrument of Japan. Koto are about 180 centimetres (71 in) length, and made from kiri wood (Paulownia tomentosa). They have 13 strings that are usually strung over 13 movable bridges along the width of the instrument. There is also a 17-string koto variant. Players can adjust the string pitches by moving the white bridges before playing. To play the instrument, the strings are plucked using three finger picks, otherwise known as plectra, (on thumb, index finger, and middle finger) (source: Wiki)
The shamisen or samisen (三味線), also sangen (三絃) — both words mean “three strings” — is a three-stringed traditional Japanese musical instrument derived from the Chinese instrument sanxian. It is played with a plectrum called a bachi.
The construction of the shamisen varies in shape, depending on the genre in which it is used. The instrument used to accompany kabuki has a thin neck, facilitating the agile and virtuosic requirements of that genre. The instrument used to accompany puppet plays and folk songs has a longer and thicker neck to match the more robust music of those genres.(source: Wiki)
 
Musical Instruments
The shakuhachi (尺八、しゃくはち, pronounced [ɕakɯhatɕi]) is a Japanese end-blown flute.It was originally introduced from China into Japan in the 6th century and underwent a resurgence in the early Edo Period. The oldest shakuhachi in Japan is currently stored in Shōsō-in, Nara. The shakuhachi is traditionally made of bamboo, but versions now exist in ABS and hardwoods. It was used by the monks of the Fuke sect of Zen Buddhism in the practice of suizen (吹禅, blowing meditation).The instrument is tuned to the minor pentatonic scale.(source: Wiki)
Musical Instruments
image source: JNTO
The tsudzumi (鼓) or tsuzumi is a Japanese hand drum of Chinese/Mongolian/Indian origin. It consists of a wooden body shaped like an hourglass, and it is taut, with two drum heads with cords that can be squeezed or released to increase or decrease the tension of the heads respectively. This mechanism allows the player to raise or lower the pitch of the drum while playing, not unlike the African talking drum. (source: Wiki)
Taiko (太鼓) are a broad range of Japanese percussion instruments.  The process of constructing taiko varies between manufacturers, and preparation of both the drum body and skin can take several years depending on methodology(source: Wiki)
The biwa (琵琶) is a Japanese short-necked fretted lute, often used in narrative storytelling. The biwa is the chosen instrument of Benten, goddess of music, eloquence, poetry, and education in Japanese Shinto.(source: Wiki)
The shō (笙) is a Japanese free reed musical instrument that was introduced from China during the Nara period (AD 710 to 794). It is descended from the Chinese sheng, although the shō tends to be smaller in size. It consists of 17 slender bamboo pipes, each of which is fitted in its base with a metal free reed. Two of the pipes are silent, although research suggests that they were used in some music during the Heian period.(source: Wiki)
Koto 
Koto
 
Shamisen 
Shamisen
Shakuhachi 
Shakuhachi
Tsuzumi
Tsuzumi
Taiko 
Taiko
Biwa
Biwa
Shō
Shō

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